Renoir – Dance at the Moulin de la Galette (1876)

This is another of the paintings which caught my eye at the last visit to the Musee D’Orsay. It is in oils and measures 131 X 175 cm.

Renoir delighted in `the people’s Paris’, of which the Moulin de la Galette near the top of Montmartre was a characteristic place of entertainment, and his picture of the Sunday afternoon dance in its acacia-shaded courtyard is one of his happiest compositions. In still-rural Montmartre, the Moulin, called `de la Galette’ from the pancake which was its speciality, had a local clientèle, especially of working girls and their young men together with a sprinkling of artists who, as Renoir did, enjoyed the spectacle and also found unprofessional models. The dapple of light is an Impressionist feature but Renoir after his bout of plein-air landscape at Argenteuil seems especially to have welcomed the opportunity to make human beings, and especially women, the main components of picture. As Manet had done in La Musique aux Tuileries he introduced a number of portraits.

The girl in the striped dress in the middle foreground was said to be Estelle, the sister of Renoir’s model, Jeanne. Another of Renoir’s models, Margot, is seen to the left dancing with the Cuban painter, Cardenas. At the foreground table at the right are the artist’s friends, Frank Lamy, Norbert Goeneutte and Georges Rivière who in the short-lived publication L’Impressionniste extolled the Moulin de la Galette as a page of history, a precious monument of Parisian life depicted with rigorous exactness. Nobody before him had thought of capturing some aspect of daily life in a canvas of such large dimensions.

The dappled light within the worrk is exquisite and a technique Renoir used in a number of other paintings.

It sold for 78.1 million dollars in 1990.

 

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